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Rediscovering Normalcy



December 8, 2011

After all the excitement, normalcy has finally returned to our little apartment in downtown Winnipeg.

Almost immediately upon landing at the airport in the early hours of October 29, I came down with yet another bout of the ’flu! 1  It hit hard, mostly with congestion and acute weariness, but still I kept my obligations and appointments, from preaching at St. Margaret’s, to meeting people for spiritual direction, to leading a “Quiet Day” of prayer and meditation.  Heather came down with the thing too, so both of us were semi-disabled for a while.

I really wanted to write up an account of the Mediterranean adventure for these pages, but first with the ’flu, and then with some kind of writer’s block, I just couldn’t get anything set down.  Finally, about a month after returning home, the mental log jam seemed to break, and the narrative began to flow.  It took almost two weeks to get everything written, but finally I was able to post it online.  Considerable tinkering, formatting, and adding pictures followed, but the main work is done, and I’m now sending out an invitation to friends and family to have a look at this creation.

I enjoy the art of writing, and a bonus in writing up something as extraordinary as our Mediterranean adventure is that I got to savour all the highlights again and again during the creative process.

But I’m glad it’s done.

What is “normalcy?” (for me at least)

Normalcy involves some clergy duty.  I preside at the occasional Sunday service at the little Anglican church in the town of Morden, Manitoba (and I will lead their Christmas Eve service as well).  I also fill in from time to time for clergy who need to be away from their congregations.  On my free Sundays, Heather and I continue to attend St. Margaret’s church together.

Normalcy also involves constant development of the “Anglican Priest” section of this website.  I get an average of 100 visitors a day, many of them leaving a footprint in the form of the query, typed into Google, that brought them to my pages.  A section of frequently asked questions about Anglican priesthood – mostly based on those queries – has become one of the busiest parts of my website, and I enjoy working on it.

I have a number of very good friends, and I enjoy meeting them for lunch or a coffee.  In the evening, now and then, Heather and I go out to visit friends together.  Other than that, I’m a bit of a homemaker and cook, while Heather continues with her law practice.  There is some suggestion that she will retire in the forseeable future, but I can’t say more than that right now.

I’m at home most days, and I like it that way.  I have an extensive email correspondence, books to read, and from time to time I play the clarinet for my own pleasure.  And I’ll admit to frequently visiting Facebook to keep in touch with my wide circle of friends and family, and to play a round or two of online Scrabble™.

There will be no more travel to exotic places for at least a year.  Unless you consider Toronto exotic.  I’ll be there in early January to participate in the ordination of a young man who first felt called to be a priest when I was the Rector (chief pastor) of his church.  It’s a pleasure and an honour for me to be with him as he takes this life-changing step.

So that’s my little update.  It’s nice to have a quiet life after all those adventures.


'Tony,' handwritten





Tony Harwood-Jones

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FOOTNOTES:

1  I had one in September, just before setting out on the trip, and another really bad one in February, not long after returning from the first cruise (is there a connection here?); and now this one.  It’s no fun.
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