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Wobble, Wobble... Thump!



May 24, 2019

I’m having trouble typing.  That’s because I fell off my bike and smashed the little finger on my right hand.  I don’t think the finger is broken, but it hurts, it’s swollen, and the tip is an ugly blue colour.  As a result, typing is tricky.

The weather was beautiful yesterday, and perfect for a bike ride. 
Around noon, I made a lunch, set up the bike, and headed out – hoping to be able to complete the full 12 kilometres, from home all the way to Werier Pond in the Assiniboine Forest.  For some reason, however, I was more nervous in traffic that I have usually been, and when I was about to enter Assiniboine Park – with several cars passing me at close quarters, I wobbled a bit, my front wheel hit the curb, and I tumbled off onto the roadside grass.  My head hit the ground, and I remember feeling a moment of gratitude for my bike helmet.  There I lay, an elderly fellow, splayed out on the grass, with a bicycle on top of me, its front wheel slowly turning.

When I looked up, all the cars had stopped, and the nearest one had its window open, with a kindly woman asking if I was all right.  As far as I could tell, no bones were broken, so I said I was fine, thanked her, and the car moved off.  The next car also had a window open and another kindly voice expressing concern.  I was pretty embarrassed, but I felt very grateful for their care.

Then, as I got back on the bike, I noticed that my wrist was bleeding.  I didn’t have a bandage in my pannier bag, but I did have some “handi-wipes,” so I stanched the bleeding, and soon it more-or-less stopped.  Not altogether, though.  So when a bunch of capable-looking adults on bikes passed me, I called out and asked if anyone had a first-aid kit, or at least a band-aid.  They stopped, whereupon I realized they were police officers.  Apparently they were on a training exercise for bike patrols.  The lead officer was certain he had band-aids on board, and was most embarrassed to find he had none, and assured me that this would henceforth be a part of their standard gear.

A bit further along, I stopped at the bike rental kiosk, and asked the guy there if he had some first aid.  He went through the stuff in his Boler trailer office, but found no band-aids.  By this time the bleeding was insignificant, so I decided to finish my ride without any further search for something to cover my cut.

Shortly after that, a woman who was running in a wooded trail parallel to the paved path on which I was riding, suddenly tripped and fell.  I stopped, but she picked herself up, insisting that she was all right, and off we both went.  I mention this merely because it underscored for me the importance of having some first-aid nearby when you go outdoors in search of physical fitness!

The rest of the bike ride was what never fails to delight me.  I made it to Werier Pond, and sat there entranced by birdsong, and watching ducks come and go on the water.  Then, because I was feeling my age a bit (due, in part, to that tumble), I took the shorter route home, then washed my cuts and bruises in soap and water, and put some iodine on the gashes.

Werier Pond in spring
My Happy Place: Werier Pond in Springtime


A couple of hours later I was to be found at the annual Directors’ banquet of the Manitoba Medical Services Foundation, wearing a good suit, a white shirt and a tie, and standing at the microphone saying Grace before their meal.

I just find typing to be a bit tricky.

It has now been twenty-four hours since the tumble, and, while my bruised and bleeding wrist seems to be healing well, the little finger on the other hand is worsening.  Oddly, I didn’t feel any discomfort in it at the time of the tumble, and it only started to turn blue late in the day.  I don’t think it’s broken, because, when I type with it, it hurts, but there’s no additonal and excruciating pain.  Still, the picture below shows that it isn’t pretty.  Call me stupid, if you will, but I don’t think I’ll bother going to a doctor. 1

a black and blue right-hand pinkie finger
Ouch!

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FEEDBACK

from Linda P., Sunday, May 26, 2019 08:59:01 PM CDT (CA)

It [the finger] does not look straight and I’m not thinking of broken but wondering about tendon or ligament.  Why not check it out in case a splint is a good idea.  No need of having a wonky finger esp if used re your musical instrument.

See footnote #1, below. — Tony




FOOTNOTES:

1  There were some very insistent voices, from friends who had visited this post via FaceBook, saying that I really should go to a doctor.  So, on Monday, May 27, I went to a walk-in clinic, where Doctor Haleis checked my finger thoroughly, and prescribed rest (no clarinet-playing) for five days; but pronounced the bones unbroken.  I merely have a hematoma – a “bruise,” in effect – which will eventually heal.
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